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Charlotte Perriand and Sergio Rodrigues dining chairs and a dining table by Metzger / IMAGE: Phil Armstrong, Cincinnati Refined / Published: 12.18.16

This Minimalist Farmhouse Will Inspire You To Live A Simpler Life

There’s minimalism. And then, there’s Metzgerism. Okay, you caught me. I just made that term up. But I made it up because that’s what I’d call the style of Matthew Metzger’s new home in Maineville, OH. He and his wife, Lisa, traded in the suburban/city life (they previously lived in Pleasant Ridge) for a quieter, more serene aesthetic and surrounding.

THE SCENE
Two acres of land bordered by a two-acre lake and undeveloped property. The house itself is 2900 square feet.

THE ARCHITECT
John Senhauser

THE TIMELINE
Broke ground in July 2014. Moved in October 2015.

THE DESIGN
Disciplined and minimal but also warm. It helps that there are over 50 windows, so the natural light is absolutely spectacular.

To fit with the landscape and overall setting, they went with the farmhouse form.

The materials of the house — white oak floors, white oak & cherry cabinets, soapstone, textured marble, and unfinished brass faucets — are minimally finished and intended to change over time.

Fun fact: Metzger milled & installed the floors and the cabinets.

THE CHALLENGES
As anyone who owns a home knows, money doesn’t grow on trees. People are always limited by their budgets. Same deal here.

One example: the board and batten exterior finish wasn’t exactly their first choice; but it fit with the overall goal and, more importantly, the budget. Senhauser (the architect) was quite helpful in finding creative compromises when other challenges arose as well.

THE ARTWORK
Much of it is Metzger’s. Along with being a lawyer, he’s a professional artist who works in many mediums (woodwork, painting, sculpture, etc.). The live-edge benches and table? Yeah, that’s him. The atmospheric paintings on the wall? Also him.

Another fun fact: Materials used for the house (e.g. marble, stones, metals, and wood) were ground down and also used in his artwork, adding color, texture, and layer that you can't just easily buy off the shelf.

THE LEFTOVER PROJECT DOCKET
A vanity in the first floor powder room. Landscaping. Stonework for the large outdoor patio. Cabinets in the laundry room.

It’ll never be finished — nothing ever really is.” -- Matthew Metzger

Yes, that’s kinda true. But we’re still digging what we’re seeing right now. Scroll back to the top to see Metzgerism in full force.

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And if you want to find out more about Metzger’s artwork, head to his website.

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